Unbind him and set him free

If you ever find yourself in Oxford make your way to the chapel of New College. There you will find a truly remarkable statue of Lazarus by Jacob Epstein. It is in white marble. As you look you will see the bands of death being stretched round the body of Lazarus almost to breaking point. He is being dragged reluctantly from the grave. This reluctance to come forth from the place of safety and death is further emphasised by the fact that his head is turned backwards as he is being pulled back to life. That beautiful piece of sculpture offers a profound insight into the story of Lazarus found in John’s Gospel:- Resistance to true freedom.

To get inside the story we need to identify our own resistance to removing the stone covering the cave where the body lay buried along with our resistance to believing the word of Jesus that endlessly gives life.

Having taken the stone away listen to the word spoken in a loud voice “Lazarus come out”. A loud voice reaching down into the very depths of all that is life taking: That echoes through the ages and that cannot be resisted. The command “Unbind him and let him go” reflect the word spoken to Moses from the Burning Bush:- “I will send you to Pharaoh that you may bring the sons of Israel out of Egypt” – the house of slavery.

These images form the basis of the Third Scrutiny as the Elect prepare themselves within their parish communities for the Easter Vigil. In fact for both the individual and the community the questions raised are demanding indeed and reach into the psyche of both:

  • What am I reluctant to reveal about myself or my community?
  • What in my life am I reluctant to change?
  • What do I or we want to keep hidden away?
  • What do I or we need to do to set others free?
  • What word or command of Jesus do I most resist?
  • What word or command of Jesus echoes deep within me?
  • From what do I or my community need to be unbound and set free?

The prayer prayed over the Elect and on behalf of the community has much to offer to these reflections. The prayer is geared towards those who are preparing for baptism at the Easter Vigil but can easily be adapted for those already one with us through baptism or for the community as a whole. The lines or words in italics are offered as a possible adaptation.

“Father of life and God not of the dead but of the living,

you sent your Son to proclaim life,

to snatch us from the realm of death,

and to lead us to the resurrection.

Free these elect (us)

from the death-dealing power of the spirit of evil,

so that they (we) may witness

to their (our) new life in the risen Christ,

for he lives and reigns for ever and ever. Amen.

(Then with hands outstretched)

Lord Jesus,

by raising Lazarus from the dead

you showed that you came that we might have life

and have it more abundantly.

Free (us) from the grasp of death

those who await your life-giving sacraments

(as we celebrate your life-giving sacraments)

and deliver them from the spirit of corruption.

(and continue to deliver us from the spirit of corruption)

Through your Spirit, who gives life,

fill them (us) with faith, hope and charity,

that they (we) may live with you always

in the glory of your resurrection

for you are Lord for ever and ever. Amen”

A thought!

“Sickness struggles to own the world. I want you to live.

Live, do you hear me? Half-living is a safe hell.

The house I build is for souls who would be well.”

‘The house I build’ by Brendan Kennelly

Ken O

03/03/08

Taking God’s love seriously

Yesterday in our parish Sunday Mass many will have experienced the first scrutiny – and allowed that gospel encounter of the woman with Jesus at the well to interpret our own lives and inner longings.  As we walk with Christ, our way, our truth, our life, along the lenten pathway towards Easter, we too meet the people he meets –  through wilderness, up and down mountains, thirsty woman, blind man, dead man, welcoming crowd, angry mob – we too enter into that sense of being ‘handed over’, and having to trust God that this is the right path.   And the scrutinies are moments of  self-searching, repentance, enlightenment.  They are described in RCIA 141 as having a spiritual purpose – to uncover and heal all that is weak, and to bring out and strengthen all that is good and strong.  Their aim is to ‘complete’ conversion and deepen our resolve to hold on to Christ.  Their focus is towards salvation and the resulting new life and freedom that brings.   As individuals and community, in reflecting on the experience of the scrutinies, may we become more and more consciously aware of being filled with Christ –  living water, light of the world, resurrection and life.  We are not diminished by the experience.. we are set free.

So, what was the experience like for you?  In what ways are you ‘thirsty’?    What does the encounter tell you about Christ?

Caroline D

25/02/08